Couples, the Internet, and Social Media, Pew Research Center

How American couples use digital technology to manage life, logistics, and emotional intimity within their relationships

Summary of Findings

The internet, cell phones, and social media have become key actors te the life of many American couples— the 66% of adults who are married or ter committed relationships. Couples use technology te the little and large moments. They negotiate overheen when to use it and when to abstain. A portion of them quarrel overheen its use and have had hurtful practices caused by tech use. At the same time, some couples find that digital devices facilitate communication and support. A majority of those te couples maintain their own separate email and social media accounts, however a smaller number report sharing accounts and calendars. And fully two-thirds of couples share passwords. The broad statistical picture looks like this:

The overall influence of technology on long term relationships

  • 10% of internet users who are married or partnered say that the internet has had a “major impact” on their relationship, and 17% say that it has had a “minor influence.” Fully 72% of married or committed online adults said the internet has “no existente influence at all” on their partnership.
  • 74% of the adult internet users who report that the internet had an influence on their marriage or partnership say the influence wasgoed positive. Still, 20% said the influence wasgoed mostly negative, and 4% said it wasgoed both good and bad.

Tech spil a source of support and communication

  • 25% of married or partnered adults who text have texted their playmate when they were both huis together.
  • 21% of cell owners or internet users te a committed relationship have felt closer to their spouse or playmate because of exchanges they had online or via text message.
  • 9% have resolved an argument with their playmate online or by text message that they were having difficulty resolving ter person.

Tech spil a source of stress

  • 25% of cell phone owners te a marriage or partnership have felt their spouse or fucking partner wasgoed dissipated by their cell phone when they were together.
  • 8% of internet users te a committed relationship have had an argument with their spouse or fucking partner about the amount of time one of them wasgoed spending online.
  • 4% of internet users te a committed relationship have gotten upset at something that they found out their spouse or fucking partner wasgoed doing online.

Youthfull adults more likely to report that technology has an impact—good and bad.

Youthful adults are more likely to report feeling closer to their spouse or fucking partner thanks to technology

  • 41% of 18-29 year olds ter serious relationships have felt closer to their playmate because of online or text message conversations.
  • 23% of 18-29 year olds ter serious relationships report resolving an argument using digital implements that they were having trouble resolving te person.

At the same time, youthfull adults are more likely to report pressure ter their relationships overheen technology use

  • 42% of cell-owning 18-29 year olds ter serious relationships say their fucking partner has bot dispersed by their mobile phone while they were together (25% of all couples say this).
  • 18% of online 18-29 year olds have argued with a fucking partner about the amount of time one of them spent online (compared with 8% of all online couples).
  • 8% say they have bot upset by something their playmate wasgoed doing online (compared with 4% of all online couples).

Overall, youthful adults are more likely to report that the internet has had an influence on their relationship

  • 45% of internet users ages 18-29 ter serious relationships say the internet has had an influence on their relationship, while just one ter ten online adults 65 and older say the same.

Collective passwords:

  • 67% of internet users te a marriage or committed relationship have collective the password to one or more of their online accounts with their spouse or fucking partner.

Collective accounts:

  • 27% of internet users te a marriage or committed relationship have an email account that they share with their fucking partner. Older adults and those who have bot ter their relationship for longer than ten years are especially likely to share an email account.
  • 11% of thesis couples have an online calendar that they share. Sharing of online calendars tends to be most prevalent among couples te their logistics-intensive middle-age period (i.e. mid-20s through mid-40s).
  • 11% of partnered or married adults who use social networking sites share a social media profile.

Spil a broad pattern, those who have bot married or partnered ten years or less have digital communication and sharing habits that differ substantially from those who have bot partnered longer. Some of this is about timing— technology a decade ago wasgoed squarely ter the pre-Facebook, pre-smartphone era, and just ten years into the development of the commercially popular Web. Those who were already together spil a duo at the advent of a fresh toneelpodium or technology were a bit more likely to hop on together, spil a unit, while those who start relationships with their own existing accounts and profiles tend to proceed to use them separately spil individuals.

Long-term couples tend to view and utilize technology finta differently compared with those who have bot together for a shorter period of time

Couples who have bot together for Ten years or less display different patterns of technology usage te the setting of their relationship compared with those who have bot together for a longer period of time. Couples who have bot together for a decade or less—also typically junior than those who have bot together for longer—are much more likely to have used dating services or the internet to meet their playmate, to use technology to help with the logistics and communication ter their relationship, and to report that the internet had an influence on their relationship. Adults who are long-partnered use technology te their relationship, but are more likely to use some of it together—by sharing email addresses and social media profiles spil a duo.

Sexting among adults is up since 2012

Technology te relationships is not just limited to coordination and logistics, it now encompasses even the more intimate moments. Sexting, or sending sexually suggestive nude or almost nude photos and movies via cell phone, is practiced by couples and singles alike.

  • 9% of adult cell owners have sent a sext of themselves to someone else, up from 6% of cell owners who said this ter 2012.
  • 20% of cell owners have received a sext of someone else they know on their phone, up from 15% who said this ter 2012.
  • 3% of cell owners have forwarded a sext to someone else – unchanged since 2012.
  • Married and partnered adults are just spil likely spil those not ter a relationship to say they have sent sexts, single adults are more likely to report receiving and forwarding such pics or movies.

About this survey

This report is based on the findings of a survey on Americans’ use of the internet. The results ter this report are based on gegevens from telephone interviews conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International from April 17 to May Nineteen, 2013, among a sample of Two,252 adults, age Eighteen and older. Telephone interviews were conducted te English and Spanish by landline (1,125) and cell phone (1,127, including 571 without a landline phone). For results based on the total sample, one can say with 95% confidence that the error attributable to sampling is plus or minus Two.Trio percentage points. For results based on married or partnered adults (n=1,428), the margin of sampling error is plus or minus Two.9 percentage points and for cell phone owners (n=Two,076) the margin of sampling error is plus or minus Two.Four percentage points.

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